Tag Archives: publish

Isn’t Romantic Shorts Just Romantic Guest Blogging?

The short answer is, yes.

The long answer is slightly more detailed, but doesn’t really change the short of it.

Romantic Shorts is looking for 4,500-6,000 word romantic short stories (blog post) to publish (post) on our website (blog). In return, the author receives a feature page (guest bio) and links back to all of his or her own works, websites, blogs, etc. Over time, the mutual help network that we create and build together becomes a sort of GO-TO place to learn about writers, their work, and their news, in addition to, before, or because of some relationship the reader already shares with the writer. In other words, Romantic Shorts is a place where writers can be introduced, read, seen, and loved. Readers who enjoy your stories here at Romantic Shorts, will seek out your own websites, other articles you’ll publish, and books you may have for sale.

I bring this up today, because I found this clip this morning that really explains, in four short minutes, how you can use a site like Romantic Shorts to help build a following for your writing. And in the end, that is the goal of every writer: readers!

And in the end, what you do with that following, is up to you…

Check out the video clip. It’s quite interesting.

Alex.

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Announcement of Winners

Romantic Shorts

is pleased to announce the winners of our

New Year New Story Writers Competition

It is a common comment after the judging is finished and the winners are to be announced.

“The judging was difficult. All of the stories are worthy of a first place finish. Our decision was quite difficult.”

And we think, “Yeah, yeah, stop trying to make everyone feel good and get to the good stuff.”

But in this case, we had a most remarkable turn of events for our competition. Because we specified “unpublished authors,” we did ourselves a bit of a disservice. We received queries, engaged in conversation, researched, asked, and deliberated at length. The big question, “What exactly, in this age of technological advance in publishing, is a published author?” We drew a line in the sand and decided that, because of the clear ambiguity of the term, we would go with what we have, and, in the future, will not make any division amongst our writers, accepting entries/submissions from all authors.

And so, after all was said and done, we received four entries that actually qualified for the competition. If we also look at the number and quality of the non-competition submissions, sent to us simply with the query to consider publication, we are most pleased with the response to our first Writers Competition!

Enough already, get to that good stuff you mentioned!

The winners of the
New Year New Story 2011 Writers Competition
are as follows:

Winning a cash prize of $40. and publication by Romantic Shorts

A centuries old curse unites good and evil,
future and past, prisoner and guard.
The power of love can release these captives from their tortured fate.
But only if they can find each other and rediscover their feelings.
Will the cards finally lead them to their heaven on earth?
Or will they be forced to relive their quest yet again?

Rosetta Stone by Ashley Long

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Winning a cash prize of $50. and publication by Romantic Shorts

Having mortgaged her very self for her marriage and children,
Laura finds herself trying to accept ‘content’
as an acceptable measure of her life.
Until a handsome stranger she knows too well
shows her that passion conquers acceptance,
and opens a door to a new beginning.

A Day In St. John’s by Deborah Schenberger

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Winning a cash prize of $100. and publication by Romantic Shorts

While VP Evangeline Martin knows exactly what she wants and how to get it,
the off duty side of this walking contradiction
has no idea what her heart truly desires.
At least, that’s how Cedric sees her.
But when her life is threatened and it falls on him to protect her,
it’s difficult to say whose heart is in more danger
and which darkness holds the greater risk.

What The Darkness Proposes, by Kirsten Blacketer

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

And, winning our top cash prize of $250. and publication by Romantic Shorts

In the true spirit of Romance,
this story deftly takes the reader on a journey through the past
in the mind of a man in love.
As we follow his memories to a time and place where his heart was free,
we hope and want for the girl on the train to be his one.
We are left with the feeling of our own first loves:
the joy, the anticipation, the excitement, and the fear,
and we connect with him in a way that leaves us in awe
of the strength of those tender moments spent with our hearts on fire.

Play Me A Song, by Jeannine Wynne

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

It is our profound pleasure to introduce these new authors to you. Congratulations to our writers!

Watch for their winning entries, as well as many other addictive romantic short stories, to appear at RomanticShorts.com beginning in August. Biographies and links to our authors’ pages will be released shortly. Readers can subscribe now to catch the launch of our much anticipated publication by clicking over to our Reading Room. Watch for announcements, polls, and perhaps the odd contest as we prepare to provide you with some of the most eagerly awaited reading on the Web.

Follow us on Twitter @RomanticShorts

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When – Exactly – Does a Writer Become a ‘Published’ Writer?

Here’s an interesting question I’d love to hear some thoughts on:

When exactly does a writer become a published writer?

These days, in the world of traditional publishing, e-publishing, self-publishing, making money, paying money, losing money, blogging, copywriting, freelancing, and a hundred other factors I could probably list, at what point is a writer considered published?

It seems a given that, were I to ask a traditionally published author and their traditional publisher, that the answer would be, of course, the writer who has successfully passed through the extensive review and judgment process typically enforced by the traditional publishing world. And while I agree with including such authors, I would argue that there are many others who should be included within this elite group of people.

I commented on a blog today as to what I believe constitutes a ‘writer’ in the first place. Allow me to indulge:

When we’re talking about anything creative – writing, painting, music, design, etc. – the concept of ‘real’ does not apply. Anybody can (attempt to) do any of these things. I would think, then, that the more important clarification is, “Yeah, but are they any good at it?”

And because ‘quality’ of creation is purely subjective, the whole idea of qualifying one’s talent becomes moot. It is experience – and the knowledge and wisdom that come with it – above all that defines us.

I went to L’Universite du Quebec and learned to speak French. I was 18, away from home for the first time, in a province where I was suddenly legally able to drink. After all was said and done, it turned out that I didn’t need the actual ‘Certificat’ to prove I could speak French. (Thankfully!)

If I create and print a document that looks exactly like a law degree and hang it on my wall, I am no closer to being a lawyer than I was yesterday. There’s a process.

The greatest creation is that of life. Anyone can become a mother/father. But the true test of ability comes when mother/father become mom/dad. It’s the process that matters.

To my adopted children, I am legally mother. It is the process – the time, the effort, the pain, the passion – that makes me their mom.

Having written two novels – neither of which I ever intended to publish – I now call myself a writer. I lived those stories, created those characters, loved them, and missed them terribly in the end. I experienced the process that saw me sitting at my keyboard prepared to write my hero and heroine into their first kiss. I can’t explain my fascination as I watched them start to bicker, get angry at each other, and stomp off in different directions. I can’t explain how it felt to watch my words take on a life beyond my own imagination. But every writer out there knows exactly what I’m talking about.

It’s the process that makes one a writer – of any style, genre, and form. In whatever fashion one chooses to express him or herself through the written word, no matter how often, how much, how good, or how bad, one becomes a writer by writing.

Publishing, in any form, is irrelevant.

It’s just a convenient way for us to try to measure what kind of writer you are.

And so, with that said, how then do we measure the talent of a writer? What are the criteria? Does it matter any more?


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