Tag Archives: romance

This Romantic Cowboy Is The Real Deal

What kind of example would Romantic Shorts set if we didn’t do something special for Valentine’s Day?

Let me introduce you to Reid Lance Rosenthal, a rancher from Wyoming who also happens to write romance. And quite well, in fact, if the first book of his Threads West: An American Saga is any indication.

I met Reid on my Twitter travels a while back and was instantly taken by his warmth and generosity. He offered to write a guest post for Romantic Shorts’ authors, and in our emails back and forth, I came to learn that he is an accomplished writer with a genuine heart. I did, however, get to thinking that I should probably read one of his books before actually posting his words. One never knows…

I ordered a copy of Threads West, the first of Reid’s eight-novel saga. It arrived sooner than I’d expected, and, as any other eager reader, the packaging never made it past the front door. I didn’t really have any expectations, good or bad, I just like starting a new book.

One glance at the cover took me to the America of the mid 1800’s. A quick read through a heartfelt dedication and intro – I get back to those later – and I jumped right in. For the better part of the rest of that day and the next – I think I heard one of my kids mutter something about throwing a pizza in the oven “…’cause Mom’s reading again…” – I thoroughly enjoyed meeting Reid’s people, getting to know them, and travelling with them through the beginning of what promises to be one hell of a journey. I recommend the read highly – reluctant to give away any details (book reviews have never been one of my strong suits). The only fallback is the ending because it is not an ending, but a beginning. And you have to wait for Reid’s pen to work its magic again.

On the plus side, as of today, there’s only another month or so to wait. The second book in the series, Maps of Fate is due out in April 17, 2012.

That should be enough time to squeeze in a second read of the first…

And in the meantime, I’ve decided to publish his guest post as a Romantic Short for our readers instead of just keeping it to ourselves. Reid sent me a post about writing romance from the male perspective. It talks more about romance than writing, but, after all, that’s the point.

With Valentine’s Day approaching, Reid’s words go a long way towards reminding us about what it is we’re actually celebrating on Tuesday.

I invite you to stop by our Reading Room and read Reid Lance Rosenthal’s This Cowboy Knows Romance. You’ll be glad you did…

Alex.

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What is Romance, anyway?

Brian Knight is the co-owner of Premium Promotional Services through which he helps up and coming authors promote their books. His journey in writing began with the creation of his blog ‘The New Author’ which he has been operating and posting articles on for almost 4 years now. His poetry and short stories have been published in magazines and anthologies. Currently Brian is preparing to write his third novel and has set the goal to join his many friends by becoming a published author.

When I first started my online journey to bring Romantic Shorts to life, one of the first people I met was Brian, through his blog The New Author. Brian’s immediate acceptance and support of my idea has been the most genuine encouragement I’ve received. I was privileged to write a guest post at The New Author, and invited Brian to share some of his experience with us. It is my pleasure to introduce Brian to you…

What Is Romance, Anyway?
By Brian Knight

We walk through the grocery stores and periodically scan the books on the shelves. Many of the books have one thing in common – the covers consist of a man without a shirt on holding a woman in some sort of revealing dress. They are either in a warm embrace or passionate kiss. Is this the sum of Romance? Is this the prime example of the Romance genre? Of course not, this is just a small piece of a very big puzzle.

So, with that said, what is Romance?

Romance is a combination of multiple aspects that combine and generate a particular response from the viewer (if it is a movie) or the reader (if it is a book). That would beg the next big questions; what are these aspects and what is the desired response(s)? Well, I’m glad you asked but before we get to that I want to take a moment and say that this is only my opinion and thoughts. With that out of the way let’s get back to the topic at hand.

Romance should reflect the passion of a couple fresh in a relationship. The aspects of a romantic story replicate the meeting, courtship, and coupling of individuals as they find love with one another. Think back for a moment to your first love. The first time you saw her or him; the first time you talked and touched. Those are the feelings we want in a romance story.

To start things off we want to give the reader that idea of something more; the anticipation needs to start building. We want the reader to think “oh, I think there might be something there.” Once we have established the hook of the budding relationship the next aspect is tension. We need to drag out the actual acknowledgement of the affection felt by the characters. Yes, drive the reader crazy; make them shout at the book and think “come on, can’t you see that he or she is in love with you?” My example of this is ‘Bones’ (the show on Fox). Everyone that watches this show knows for a fact that Booth and Bones love each other but they make excuses why they shouldn’t be together or situations arise that keep them apart. Once you have dragged this out to the point that the reader simply can’t take it anymore, and you have built it up to the highest of high it’s time to deliver. At this point you might be thinking – alright time for the sex scene – but you would be wrong. There is a place for hot and steamy scenes in a romance novel but not yet. True romance is delivered with the first kiss. It is in that kiss that the sparks fly and the hearts of readers melt. Why is that? Well, think back to your first kiss with your significant other. You were nervous but once your lips touched the world fell away, your knees got weak, and all that remained was the kiss.

Some of the greatest romance novels gravitate around the kiss. For example, the kiss in ‘Romeo and Juliet’ completed shifted the flow of the story and confirmed their love. An even more iconic kiss can be found in ‘Gone with the Wind.’ When Rhett kissed Scarlett O’Hara, I’m sure there was a sigh of relief and a smile on the face of every reader. That kiss delivered the full blow of passion that everyone knew existed. Okay, take a moment and let those thoughts and memories dance a little. This is not the last of the romance roller coaster.

A true romance takes another step and that step is dejection, rejection, turmoil, or separation. That’s right, you need drama. Your main characters need to be pulled apart for some reason that deals with your plot. Often this can be done by the introduction of a third character but it can be just about anything that maintains the flow of your story. The next aspect of this is the groveling and pining for each other. The reader needs to see and feel their pain when they are apart. The reader needs to know that the only cure is for them to be together. This, of course, brings us to the finish line.

From now to the end of your novel you complete the plot and resolve the drama. I’m getting ahead of myself here. First, the main characters need to be brought back together. This is the critical time and (depending on your story) this would be the perfect time to insert the hot and steamy scene. This is the time when their passion is overwhelming all thought and reason. The perfect example of this is ‘The Notebook’. I’m sure you’ve seen the movie so let’s have an experiment. Do you think the story would have the same impact if the sex scene was closer to the beginning or after they were separated for so long? These scenes are important but should be handled with care and placed properly. One other note about sex scenes; they don’t have to be so detailed or graphic. Romance resides in the mind of the reader and if you, as the author, take away that ability for the reader to imagine the scene as they see it, then the story will lose part of that impact that we all want. Think of it this way, when you first met your significant other did you picture them naked? Did you fantasize about what it would be like to sleep with them? Do you remember the emotion and energy that produced? This is what we are looking for. In sex scenes we want to give enough to paint the picture but leave enough out so the reader can add the details.

This brings me back to my original question. What is romance? Romance is the combination of drama, tension, innocence, passion, loss and desire that prompts an actual stirring of feelings within us. These elements combine to form those fantasies and memories that we hold on to as we grow old.

I thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts and opinions regarding romance stories. It is my hope that they free your mind to think and develop your own opinions about this complex genre. I also want to thank Alex for the opportunity to appear on Romantic Shorts.

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Writers' Contests

We are very excited about the response we’re receiving to our new Writers’ Competition, ‘New Year New Story 2011.’ The deadline for this competition is March 31st, and details about what we’re looking for and how to enter are available right here.

For those who are inquiring about the option of submitting by the standard practice of querying your idea, the answer is yes, absolutely!

Romantic Shorts is accepting unsolicited manuscripts of short romantic stories, 4500-6000 words, from established and published authors, as well as the newest of new writers and students. This is a great opportunity to build your resume, your skill, and your reputation, especially if you are trying to break into the field.

Keep in mind that Romantic Shorts is new, unique, and untried. That doesn’t mean, however, that we don’t adhere to the highest expectations of quality, expertise, and integrity, both for ourselves and our authors. It does mean that we’re in this because we love what we’re doing, want to enjoy it, learn from it, build it. Your experience with Romantic Shorts may be a little different from relationships you’ve had in the past with other publishers; but we’re positive that that will be a good thing – for all of us.

This is a very fascinating time for us. We’re looking forward to hearing from you, and quite possibly working with you as we grow our little website into a publishing house that leads with its reputation, its promise, and its quality.

Check us out. www.RomanticShorts.com

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